Friday, July 24, 2015

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #45

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

The H-2 visa program invites foreign workers to do some of the most menial labor in America. Then it leaves them at the mercy of their employers. Thousands of these workers have been abused — deprived of their fair pay, imprisoned, starved, beaten, raped, and threatened with deportation if they dare complain. And the government says it can do little to help. This is a damn fine article.

Which Famous Artist Were You In Your Past Life? at BuzzFeed
"You got: Vincent van Gogh. You probably drank too much and ruined all of your friendships with your alienating personality." accurate




It's Newport Folk Fest time y'all. Fifty years ago this week, a sea of fans gathered for Bob Dylan’s performance at the Newport, Rhode Island Folk Festival. The audience expected the singer-songwriter to play his usual selection of stripped-down acoustic tunes, and many were stunned when he instead took the stage with a full backup band and an electric guitar. The chaotic set that followed provoked boos from the crowd and criticism from the folk music establishment, but it also signaled Dylan’s emergence as a rock ’n’ roll icon.

The “Tomb of Philip” in the northern Greek town of Vergina does not belong to King Philip II of Macedon, says new research which fuels the long-standing dispute over the final resting place of Alexander the Great’s father.




Historical Reality Shows: our pick of the best at History Extra
People around the world are taking to Twitter to put a historical spin on popular reality television shows.

They have survived thousands of years since their birth in ancient Rome, but Roman numerals are finally to be phased out after they were deemed too complicated for the modern-day capital.



Groening, who's in his 90s, was found guilty of being an accessory to the murder of 300,000 people at the Auschwitz death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland during World War II.

Fragments of what could be the world’s oldest Koran have been found in an English library after laying unrecognized for nearly a century.


More than 25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the massive sculpture of the revolutionary’s head is to be exhumed from the obscure sandpit where it was buried after the fall of communism and restored to the city. The head once formed part of a giant 62-foot tall statue of Lenin that stood over East Berlin.

Though scientists had long known that the Franklin expedition shipmen likely resorted to cannibalism to survive, the new study reveals the true extremes the crew went to. Not only did the starving explorers cut flesh off the bones of their fallen comrades, they also cracked open the bones to suck out the marrow.

Saturday, July 11, 2015

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #44

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

Evita Lobotomized By Her Husband for Control at Discovery
Not the first woman to undergo this procedure to "correct" her behavior, not the last. (See, Rosemary Kennedy). Eva Perón, the fiery first lady of Argentina in the 1940s and early 1950s, was lobotomized at the order of her husband, Juan Perón, not only to control the pain of her cancer, but also to control her increasingly erratic behavior, according to a new paper that researched her operation by interviewing those who were there.

This is a complex issue, and therefore Minions should explain it. I fucking love BuzzFeed. They think of everything.

The launch of 'Woman on the Map' lets you hit the streets and discover the amazing women history forgot.



I don't know about you, but I've always wanted to know the exact time of day this photo was captured. who cares

Photos: Remembering the Victims of the Srebrenica Massacre at Newsweek
The largest massacre in Europe since the Holocaust, 20 years later.

A crowd of furious Bosnian Muslims jumped over fences and attacked Serbia’s prime minister with stones and water bottles on Saturday, marring the 20th anniversary commemorations of the massacre in Srebrenica, in eastern Bosnia.



A day before the doomed departure, the plaque was presented to Lord William James Pirrie, chairman of shipbuilder Harland and Wolff, which built the Titanic.

A first for the Chesapeake area.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #42

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

In a long-sought victory for the gay rights movement, the Supreme Court ruled 5-4 yesterday that the Constitution guarantees a nationwide right to same-sex marriage. Although the gay marriage movement has only hit its stride in the United States in the 21st century, gay men and women have been a part of America since this nation's founding - and long before that.

Confederate Flag: Stars and Bars Deconstructed at Discovery
The Confederate flag took one more step toward eventual obscurity this week. Following the shooting spree at the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, S.C., politicians and businesses lined up against the historically divisive banner.



A Brief History Of The Confederate Flag at BuzzFeed
To my friends who think the flag simply means "I love cowboy boots, muddin', fishin', and huntin'": it doesn't. It doesn't mean what you think it means and it's offensive so peel the stupid flag bumper sticker off your truck and move the fuck on.

Scan of 'mummified' body of Swedish bishop reveals baby hidden in coffin at Telegraph
I didn't think this was interesting until I read the part where the baby was concealed under his feet.



Can We Guess What Period In History You Actually Belong In? at BuzzFeed

Woman To Be Featured on Newly Redesigned $10 Bill, Treasury Announces at History
After months of campaigning, advocates including the Woman on 20s organization, Senator Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire and the 600,000 participants in an online public election got what they wanted - kind of.


Periods Through The Periods at BuzzFeed
Yes, that period.

This 5,300 Year-Old Corpse Was Found by Accident at Smithsonian
psssssst It's Ötzi.

Ancient Greek Zombies Discovered at Archaeology
The zombie craze is not a new phenomenon, but one with evidence going back more than 2,000 years.

Friday, June 19, 2015

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #41

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

The search for Amelia Earhart is continuing through more downs than ups in Nikumaroro, an uninhabited South Pacific atoll in the republic of Kiribati.

In ancient Egypt, so many people worshiped Anubis, the jackal-headed god of death, that the catacombs next to his sacred temple once held nearly 8 million mummified puppies and grown dogs, a new study finds.



The Charleston church where a horrific shooting claimed the lives of nine people boasts a rich history echoing America’s own painful passage through slavery, civil rights, and now, its racially turbulent present.

Distant British Past Is Also Present for Salisbury at New York Times
Featuring my favorite, Arthur Pendragon.



Against all odds, British rock legend Phil Collins has had a lifelong fascination with the Alamo. Now after amassing the world’s largest private collection of artifacts connected to the Alamo, Collins has donated it to the cradle of Texas liberty.

History Hot 100 2015 at History Extra
This year’s History Hot 100 was the product of six weeks of voting by readers and historians who were asked to nominate the historical figures they are most interested in at the moment.



To mark the 200th anniversary on June 18th, here is a chance to test your knowledge of a pivotal moment in European military history.

Richard III was found under a carpark - and Henry I could be under one, too. One day carparks themselves could be the archaeological treasures