Sunday, July 3, 2016

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #75

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

Nazi-looted art rescued by the US military’s “Monuments Men” was not returned to its rightful Jewish owners at the end of the war but sold for profit by the Bavarian authorities, according to explosive new claims. You ain't no hero George Clooney.

Teach history with Game of Thrones to finally get children interested in forgotten medieval period, says Oxford tutor at Telegraph
Oh hey I did that too, American edition.



I've been thinking a lot about how many people are inherently racist. How the hatred or distrust of marginalized people has been passed down through generations. I'm talking about Donald Trump and his like-minded supporters.

The Israel Antiquities Authority has announced that an international team of researchers has discovered the location of a 100-foot-long tunnel that Jewish prisoners dug by hand and spoon to flee a Nazi death camp in Lithuania, confirming a long-told story of one of the Holocaust’s great escapes.



#WeAreHere: WWI ‘soldiers’ appear across UK in ‘moving and powerful’ Somme tribute at Telegraph
Volunteers dressed as World War I soldiers appeared at transport hubs across the UK on Friday morning as part of Battle of the Somme commemorations, marking the centenary of the 141-day campaign that began this day in 1916.



Battle of the Somme: Royals at Somme centenary commemoration at BBC
Thousands of people, including members of the Royal Family, have attended a ceremony in France to mark the centenary of the Battle of the Somme. More than a million men were killed or wounded on all sides at the Somme. The Battle of the Somme, one of WW1's bloodiest, was fought in northern France and lasted five months, with the British suffering almost 60,000 casualties on the first day alone.

The warnings of the Holocaust have never been more relevant in Britain at Telegraph
Since the EU referendum result on Friday these have not been isolated incidents. There has been a 57 per cent rise in hate crime incidents according to the National Police Chief’s Council, leading to the Polish Embassy seeking reassurance from the police, and a variety of senior politicians voicing their concerns. History is the usually the best place to start in trying to understand such questions, and when it comes to racism, prejudice and the internalisation of a hateful ideology, the Holocaust is the benchmark against which other events should be measured.

Saturday, June 25, 2016

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #74

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

In a nationwide referendum held yesterday, a majority of British citizens voted for the United Kingdom to leave the European Union. Though undoubtedly a historic decision, Brexit is also only the latest development in the conflicted relationship between the UK and the EU that has played out over the past 50 years.

Women are allowed to take part in jousting at English Heritage events for the first time this year, as they abandon strict historical accuracy for gender equality.

To hear Democrats tell it, the “historic” sit-in in the House last week was a noble effort to bar terrorists from buying guns, on par with the suffragette movement, the heroic defiance of the civil rights movement, and the valiant efforts of Father Lankester Merrin to save the soul of Regan MacNeil in The Exorcist, all rolled into one.



Harvard Professor Concedes “Gospel of Jesus’s Wife” Likely Fake at History
A Harvard professor garnered worldwide headlines in 2012 when she revealed the existence of a tiny papyrus scrap that suggested Jesus had been married. New evidence unearthed by the Atlantic magazine about the provenance of the papyrus has led the professor to reverse course and admit that it is likely a modern forgery.

US officials say the Pentagon will lift its ban on openly transgender service personnel next month. Defence Secretary Ash Carter has called the regulation outdated and harmful to the military. Can we next work on abolishing the short crew cut required by military men but not women? because I am personally effected by that.



Remains of Ancient Greek Naval Base Discovered Near Athens at History
As part of a recent excavation of Piraeus Harbor, a team of archaeologists discovered the remains of an ancient naval base estimated to date to between 520 and 480 B.C., the year the Battle of Salamis took place. With six sheds, each designed to hold hundreds of vessels, the complex would have been one of the largest structures in the ancient world.

Discovery of Roman coins in Devon redraws map of empire at The Guardian
The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain.

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #73

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.



Researchers say the findings overturn a 2001 paper that argued the oldest known Australian human remains found near Lake Mungo in New South Wales were from an extinct lineage of modern humans that occupied the continent before Aboriginal Australians.



What is Hamilton? A 12-step guide to your new musical obsession at Telegraph
Hamilton is already one of the most successful Broadway musicals ever, but the majority of its most ardent fans have never actually seen it. Since it opened in New York in 2015, the show - a hip-hop musical about the life of American founding father Alexander Hamilton and the American revolution  (this is my kind of history)- has sold out its whole run, won the Pulitzer Prize for drama, and was nominated for a record-breaking 16 Tony awards, eventually winning 11.



Clinton Embraces History at BuzzFeed
The first woman to be a major party’s presidential nominee has had a complicated relationship with her gender and politics. Last Tuesday, her victory speech made it a centerpiece. The message then, and now: “Don’t let anyone tell you that great things can’t happen in America,” Clinton said. “Barriers can come down. Justice and equality can win. Our history has moved in that direction, slowly at times, but unmistakably. Thanks to generations of Americans who refuse to give up or back down.”



Buckingham Palace’s balcony: a focal point for national celebration at History Extra
From George V’s appearance on the eve of the First World War to Prince William and Kate Middleton’s post-wedding kiss in 2011, the Buckingham Palace balcony has been the setting of many iconic moments in history. Ahead of Queen Elizabeth II’s 90th birthday celebrations, History Extra explores the history of the famous balcony.



Mutilated Remains Surface From 6,000-Year-Old French Massacre at History
Between 4400 and 4200 B.C., a group of men from the region around modern-day Paris appear to have ventured into Alsace in northeastern France. Whatever they were seeking, they met a gruesome fate, as local warriors are believed to have massacred the newcomers and dumped their mutilated bodies into a circular pit used to store grain and other food.



King Henry I – another king under another car park? at The Guardian
The monarch is thought to have been buried beneath a Reading car park – fuelling hopes that the town might be set for a similar footballing miracle to Richard III in Leicester.

Sunday, June 5, 2016

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #72

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

Researchers who analyzed metal composition of dagger within wrapping of mummified teenage king say it ‘strongly suggests an extraterrestrial origin’.

But she politely declined warning the choice would be ‘most regrettable’ if it turned out to be a hoax.



The impact he had and the evolution he brought led people to accept the integration of blacks into American society, so when when history books are read in 50 years’ time, there will be a significant chapter about Muhammad Ali in the history of American civilization.

Reprint of Hitler’s ‘Mein Kampf’ Tests German Law at NY Times
A German publisher of right-wing books has begun selling a reprint of Adolf Hitler’s “Mein Kampf,” originally issued in 1943 by the Nazi party’s central publishing house, a move that risks violating Germany’s law against the distribution of Nazi propaganda.



Ancient Civilization of Microbes, Not Greeks, Built ‘Lost City’ at NY Times
The columns and other objects, they say, are not stonework at all, but a natural byproduct of the breakdown of methane gas. And they were made by an ancient civilization of microbes, not people.

A Letter Written by Charles Darwin, Twice Stolen, Returns to the Smithsonian at Smithsonian
After being snatched by an intern in the mid 1970s, the missive written by the scientist returns to Washington

The Mystery of England's Ancient Tunnels at BBC
More than a dozen tunnels have been found beneath Cornwall’s countryside, dating back some 2,400 years. But why do they exist?

Tuesday, May 31, 2016

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb #71

HTHS Weekly: History from the Interweb is a round-up of brand spankin' new history articles, selected by yours truly. Click on the link to be directed to the home site where you can read a professional being professional in their entirety.

The world of archaeology was electrified last year by the news that Tutankhamun’s tomb could contain hidden chambers possibly containing the remains and riches of Queen Nefertiti. It was a story that seemed to have everything: false walls, buried treasure, at least one mummy – and new hope for Egypt’s ailing tourist industry.

In an address at a conference in Thessaloniki, Greece, commemorating the 2,400th anniversary of Aristotle’s birth, the archaeologist, Konstantinos Sismanidis, said he had “no proof but strong indications, as certain as one can be,” to support his claim.



The copy of the letter, which includes impressions about the people, flora and fauna of the Americas, was stolen at least 24 years ago.

HatshesutHatshepsutHatshepsut

A forensic search identifies direct descendants of the Renaissance genius.



Say whaaaat. A legal manoeuvre, known as ‘arresting’ the shipwrecks, could secure ownership with Rhode Island if the wreck is indeed found at the bottom of Newport Harbor.

psssst...it's at Bear River.